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Agile Ísland ráðstefnan verður haldin í 8. sinn þann 5. nóvember á Hilton Reykjavík Nordica

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Fyrirlesarar

Mary Poppendieck

Eitt stærsta nafnið í agile heiminum. Höfundur Lean Software Development bókanna.

Mary Poppendieck started her career as a process control programmer, moved on to manage the IT department of a manufacturing plant, and then ended up in product development, where she was both a product champion and department manager.

Mary considered retirement 1998, but instead found herself managing a government software project where she first encountered the word "waterfall." When Mary compared her experience in successful software and product development to the prevailing opinions about how to manage software projects, she decided the time had come for a new paradigm. She wrote the award-winning book Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit in 2003 to explain how the lean principles from manufacturing offer a better approach to software development.

Over the past several years, Mary has found retirement elusive as she lectures and teaches classes with her husband Tom. Based on their on-going learning, they wrote a second book, Implementing Lean Software Development: From Concept to Cash in 2006, a third, Leading Lean Software Development: Results are Not the Point in 2009, and a fourth book, The Lean Mindset: Ask the Right Questions in 2013. A popular writer and speaker, Mary continues to bring fresh perspectives to the world of software development.

Mary Poppendieck

Eitt stærsta nafnið í agile heiminum. Höfundur Lean Software Development bókanna.

Roman Pichler

Product Management gúrú

Roman Pichler is a leading agile product management and Scrum expert, and the founder of Pichler Consulting. He has more than 10 years experience in training and coaching product managers and product owners, and a long track record in helping companies apply agile practices to achieve business success. Roman is the author of “Agile Product Management with Scrum”. He has created several powerful agile product management and UX tools, and he writes a popular blog on product ownership.

Roman Pichler

Product Management gúrú.

James A. Lewis

Microservices maðurinn. Ráðgjafi hjá ThoughtWorks

James Lewis is passionate about XP, BDD, Agile methodologies and speaks at international conferences on topics ranging from domain driven design, micro-services, SOA, and lean thinking.

As a Principle Consultant for ThoughtWorks, James has helped introduce evolutionary architecture practices and agile software development techniques to various blue chip companies from Investment Banks through publishers to media organisations.

James studied Astrophysics in the 90's but got sick of programming in Fortran. Fifteen years of DBA, software engineering, design and architecture later, he believes that writing the software is the easy part of the problem. Most of the time it's about getting people thinking right.

James A. Lewis

Microservices maðurinn. Ráðgjafi hjá ThoughtWorks.

Michele Ide-Smith

UX hönnuður hjá Design Spark í Háskólanum í Cambridge

Michele Ide-Smith is a user experience designer with 16 years of web and mobile development experience. Michele loves building UX communities including organising UX events for the Cambridge Usability Group and reviewing the programme for UX Cambridge and UX Scotland.

Also an Agile and Lean UX advocate, Michele speaks at conferences worldwide, as well as running workshops on topics including Sketchnoting and collaboration techniques.

With experience in a digital agency, local Government and a software company, Michele is now working in an innovation unit at the University of Cambridge.

Michele Ide-Smith

UX hönnuður hjá Design Spark í Háskólanum í Cambridge.

Fleiri fyrirlesarar í dagskránni hér að neðan

Dagskrá

8.20 – 8.50

Morgunmatur og innskráning

8.50 – 9.00

Setning ráðstefnu

9.00 – 10.00

Lykilræða: The Lean Mindset

Mary Poppendieck

Mary Poppendieck

The Lean Mindset

The Little Engine that Could is a child's book about a tiny engine trying to haul a trainload of toys over a very big mountain. Larger engines have been asked for help, but hauling toys is beneath their dignity. So the little engine agrees to try, and as it chugs up the mountain saying to itself "I think I can, I think I can, I think I can..." readers wonder if it will get to the top. This little engine has the Lean Mindset. It welcomes challenge and is not afraid to fail. It's the kind of mindset that keeps athletes training for years in order to compete in the Olympics; that encourages musicians to practice for hours each day. Athletes and musicians know that if you do not make mistakes when you practice, you aren't improving.

Yet in our companies, we expect perfection; we have no systems that encourage people to stretch beyond the limits of success and learn through failure. We do not look for leaders who are still learning – we look instead for leaders who are done learning – and we deserve what we get.

The Lean Mindset brings a sense of adventure and experimentation and learning to our work. It encourages us to hire little engines that can rather than big engines that can't. It values improvement – which means we aren't yet perfect; it values exploration – rather than executing the wrong plan; it welcomes failure – because failure means we have raised our game to the next level.

Bio

Mary Poppendieck started her career as a process control programmer, moved on to manage the IT department of a manufacturing plant, and then ended up in product development, where she was both a product champion and department manager.

Mary considered retirement 1998, but instead found herself managing a government software project where she first encountered the word "waterfall." When Mary compared her experience in successful software and product development to the prevailing opinions about how to manage software projects, she decided the time had come for a new paradigm. She wrote the award-winning book Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit in 2003 to explain how the lean principles from manufacturing offer a better approach to software development.

Over the past several years, Mary has found retirement elusive as she lectures and teaches classes with her husband Tom. Based on their on-going learning, they wrote a second book, Implementing Lean Software Development: From Concept to Cash in 2006, a third, Leading Lean Software Development: Results are Not the Point in 2009, and a fourth book, The Lean Mindset: Ask the Right Questions in 2013. A popular writer and speaker, Mary continues to bring fresh perspectives to the world of software development.

10.00 – 10.20

Kaffi og spjall

Salur A: Fólkið

Salur B: Tæknin

10.20 – 11.05

Building a Product Users Want

Roman Pichler

Agility and the essence of software architecture

Simon Brown

Roman Pichler

Building a Product Users Want

Agile development methods such as Scrum and Kanban are great for quickly developing software product products. Unfortunately, they provide little guidance on how we can decide if the product should be built in the first place. Who it is for, what problem does it solve, how does it differ from other offerings, and what are its desired business benefits? In the worst case, we rush into building a product that nobody wants and needs without realising it.

This talk discusses how we can avoid building the wrong product and instead create software that users really want. I share my experiences about using a valid product strategy, and I introduce the Vision Board, a simple yet effective tool that helps you test the market, the value proposition, and the business goals before developing the actual product.

Bio

Roman Pichler is a leading agile product management and Scrum expert, and the founder of Pichler Consulting. He has more than 10 years experience in training and coaching product managers and product owners, and a long track record in helping companies apply agile practices to achieve business success. Roman is the author of “Agile Product Management with Scrum”. He has created several powerful agile product management and UX tools, and he writes a popular blog on product ownership.

Simon Brown

Agility and the essence of software architecture

On one hand the software development industry is pushing forward, reinventing the way that we build software, striving for agility and craftsmanship at every turn. On the other though, we're continually forgetting the good of the past and software teams are still failing on an alarmingly regular basis. Software architecture plays a pivotal role in the delivery of successful software yet it's often neglected.

Whether performed by one person or shared amongst the team, the software architecture role exists on even the most agile of teams yet the balance of up front and evolutionary thinking often reflects aspiration rather than reality. By steering away from big up front design and ivory tower architects, many teams now struggle to create a consistent, shared technical vision to work from. This can result in chaos, big balls of mud or software that still fails to meet its goals, despite continuous user involvement.

This talk will explore the importance of software architecture and the consequences of not thinking about it, before introducing some lightweight techniques to bring the essence of software architecture back into an agile environment. We'll look at creating a shared vision within the development team, effectively communicating that vision and managing technical risk. I'll also share the strategies that I've used to introduce these techniques into agile teams, even those that didn't think that they needed them. Expect collaboration, sketching and plenty of gamestorming.

Bio

Simon Brown lives on the island of Jersey and is an independent consultant, founder of Coding the Architecture and is either a software architect who likes to code or a software developer who understands architecture, we’re just not quite sure which. In any case, Simon has successfully delivered a variety of projects on both the Microsoft .NET and Java platform.

Simon is an award-winning speaker and regularly gives his lectures to audiences across Europe on the subjects of software architecture and its role in modern software development. He is also the author of Software Architecture for Developers, which is being published incrementally through Leanpub. He also still writes code too.

11.10 – 11.55

Rapid Product Design in the Wild

Michele Ide-Smith

So Long, and Thanks for All the Tests

Seb Rose

Michele Ide-Smith

Rapid Product Design in the Wild

How do you know you're developing the right product? This talk will help you think creatively about how to do customer development using Agile and Lean User Experience methods. I'll share what we learnt about using rapid, iterative prototyping techniques to develop a minimum viable product at a software conference.

In August 2012 we attended Kscope, a conference for Oracle developers. Instead of doing the usual product demonstrations, we turned our stand into a live lab and took Agile development processes out of the office and in front of our customers. Our stand included an area for customer research, a Kanban board and information radiators in the form of a whiteboard, blank wall and a large digital screen. Over 3 days we ran 9 sprints and conducted 25 customer interviews, using a paper prototype to get feedback. We collected invaluable information about our customers' development environments, how they work with their teams, their processes, tasks and pain points. By the end of the conference my colleague had developed an interactive HTML/CSS prototype which potential customers could evaluate. The team went through several rapid build-measure-learn cycles to improve our product concept and validate the market need.

I’ll cover the benefits and pitfalls of doing live design and development in front of potential customers and competitors. For example:

  • doing guerilla research with no up-front participant recruitment;
  • analysing and making sense of large amounts of research data on the fly;
  • making your design and development process transparent;
  • recording and communicating research insights for future reference and remote team members.

The talk will illustrate how opening up our development process at a trade show provided visitors to the stand with an opportunity to experience Agile and Lean methods first-hand, and that marketing teams can learn a lot from Agile development teams.

Anyone directly involved in product design, development and marketing would get value from attending.

Bio

Michele Ide-Smith is a user experience designer with 16 years of web and mobile development experience. Michele loves building UX communities including organising UX events for the Cambridge Usability Group and reviewing the programme for UX Cambridge and UX Scotland.

Also an Agile and Lean UX advocate, Michele speaks at conferences worldwide, as well as running workshops on topics including Sketchnoting and collaboration techniques.

With experience in a digital agency, local Government and a software company, Michele is now working in an innovation unit at the University of Cambridge.

Seb Rose

So Long, and Thanks for All the Tests

Seb Rose explores the choices a team needs to make when considering which Agile test practices to adopt, urging teams to practice, practice, practice until they are happy with the way they code.

Bio

Seb Rose is an independent developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He has worked for many well-known companies, such as Amazon, IBM, NCR, HBOS, Standard Life and Aegon. He is a regular conference speaker (XP2013, ScanDev, NDC, SPA, ACCU, XPDay, Agile North, Developer Day Scotland, Agile on the Beach, Lean Agile Scotland) as well as a contributor to "97 Things Every Programmer Should Know."

12.00 – 12.45

Hádegismatur

12.45 – 13.30

Continuously Deploying Culture at Etsy

Rich Smith

The Minimum Delightful Product: Why MVP is Not Enough

Ólafur Nielsen

Rich Smith

Continuously Deploying Culture at Etsy

There was a time not too long ago when Etsy was laden with barriers, silos, broken communication, and non-cooperation. This talk will focus on the various stages of the development of Etsy's engineering culture from the early days to resent, and how security is integrated into the engineering life-cycles without becoming inhibitive to engineers creativity.

There will be discussion of how Etsy overcame numerous challenges and built a strong company engineering culture while continuing to scale rapidly and how we strive to embrace security throughout.

Bio

Rich has worked professionally in the space of information security for over 10 years where his research has been focused on the areas offensive tooling, framework design, post-exploitation strategies alongside continual vulnerability research and exploit development.

Rich is currently the Director of Security Engineering for Etsy where he drives the development & strategies of one of todays most widely recognized and progressive security teams. His research at Etsy focuses on developing state of the art approaches for their data driven security and attack simulation initiatives, along with exploring new ways to build & develop & integrate effective security organizations.

Prior to his role at Etsy Rich co-founded Syndis, Iceland’s premier technical security company, where he continues to hold a seat on the board. Rich also led the Attack Technology Division at Kyrus Technology, was Vice President of Cyber Threat at Morgan Stanley, held a senior researcher position at Immunity Inc, and led the Research In Offensive Technologies and Threats group at Hewlett-Packard Research Labs.

Ólafur Nielsen

The Minimum Delightful Product: Why MVP is Not Enough

In his talk, Ólafur will explain what the minimum delightful product is and discuss why the much renowned MVP approach to product functionality is not enough. How is user experience design changing the job of the developer and how can he survive in a new world order? Coming from the technical side of life, Ólafur will demonstrate how developers can “bump the lamp” when it comes to crafting rich user experiences.

13.35 – 14.20

The Rise of the Consumer

Mary Poppendieck

Microservices and the one true way

James A. Lewis

Mary Poppendieck

The Rise of the Consumer

"When we looked at the products we produced, we had to admit that they lacked greatness. Our customers were satisfied, but rarely were they delighted, enchanted, captivated by novel innovation or creative design. Our software looked like it was thought of one customer-driven feature at a time – which is more or less what happened. It became evident that conventional Agile/Scrum lacked the creative workflows to find the right product to build." So began the journey of one consulting firm from disciplined software development to disciplined creative innovation. These days the firm's customers aren't just satisfied, they are thrilled.

The defining characteristic of brilliant consumer products is the elegant combination of design and technology to create a product with a unified wholeness. It feels right. It works right. It makes sense. It's just what I wanted and I didn't know it until I saw it. In today's competitive environment, this sense of design is what makes products great and gives them staying power.

This talk is about returning the power of design to the people developing the product – it's about expecting our teams to grapple with the whole problem and engineer complete solutions.

Bio

Mary Poppendieck started her career as a process control programmer, moved on to manage the IT department of a manufacturing plant, and then ended up in product development, where she was both a product champion and department manager.

Mary considered retirement 1998, but instead found herself managing a government software project where she first encountered the word "waterfall." When Mary compared her experience in successful software and product development to the prevailing opinions about how to manage software projects, she decided the time had come for a new paradigm. She wrote the award-winning book Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit in 2003 to explain how the lean principles from manufacturing offer a better approach to software development.

Over the past several years, Mary has found retirement elusive as she lectures and teaches classes with her husband Tom. Based on their on-going learning, they wrote a second book, Implementing Lean Software Development: From Concept to Cash in 2006, a third, Leading Lean Software Development: Results are Not the Point in 2009, and a fourth book, The Lean Mindset: Ask the Right Questions in 2013. A popular writer and speaker, Mary continues to bring fresh perspectives to the world of software development.

James A. Lewis

Microservices and the one true way

When should you use microservices? Scratch that, what on earth are they? Opinions range from “it’s just SOA, move along”, to “they are just the awesome”, to “you must be insane”. In order to understand when they might be useful - what problems they solve and why - we need to at least know what they are, before semantic diffusion claims them in all it’s ignominy.

The speaker will examine the characteristics of the microservice style using examples from his experiences over the last few years. Topics covered include the reasons you might want to split an application (or not), the benefits and the drawbacks of the style based on these real world experiences. Remember though, Rule 16. Distrust all claims for "one true way”.

Bio

James Lewis is passionate about XP, BDD, Agile methodologies and speaks at international conferences on topics ranging from domain driven design, micro-services, SOA, and lean thinking.

As a Principle Consultant for ThoughtWorks, James has helped introduce evolutionary architecture practices and agile software development techniques to various blue chip companies from Investment Banks through publishers to media organisations.

James studied Astrophysics in the 90's but got sick of programming in Fortran. Fifteen years of DBA, software engineering, design and architecture later, he believes that writing the software is the easy part of the problem. Most of the time it's about getting people thinking right.

14.20 – 14.40

Kaffi og spjall

14.40 – 17.00

Opið rými

17.00 – 18.00

Drykkir og meira opið rými :-)

Agile Ísland 2014 vikan

3. - 4. nóv

8.30 – 17.00

Lean Software Development Workshop

Mary Poppendieck

Verð179.000 kr.

Mary Poppendieck

Lean Software Development Workshop

Software is the heart and soul of a vast number of products and business processes; every year the ability to develop robust software systems quickly and reliably becomes more critical to the world economy. Yet all to often companies use software development processes that were born when systems were coded in assembly language and computer hardware was more expensive than programmers' salaries.

Today we have pervasive internet, omnipresent social media, big data, and massively scalable hardware. These advances have flourished largely outside the realm of traditional software development practices, and they call into question the conventional wisdom of what it means to develop, scale, and maintain excellent software-intensive systems.

It's time to re-think our approach to software development processes, our perception of the people who create software, and our governance systems. This two day workshop presents an alternate framework for thinking about developing software-intensive systems - one based on Lean principles and focused on innovation.

You will Learn:

  • How to discover what customers really want.
  • Who should design/engineer solutions to customer problems.
  • How to look at your process from a customer's point of view and identify waste.
  • What's wrong with software testing and what you have to do to fix it.
  • What organizational structures are most likely to foster innovation.
  • Scheduling strategies that permit confident promise-dating and reliable delivery.
  • Tools for problem solving that everyone in the organization can use.
  • Leadership roles that work - from the perspective of followers.

You will be asked to read short articles and watch videos on each topic prior to the workshop - come prepared for thoughtful discussion!

Learn from the Experts:

Learn first-hand from thought-leaders Mary and Tom Poppendieck how to reframe your software development process from the perspective of lean principles. Mary and Tom have pioneered the application of Lean Thinking to software development and documented their principles in books (below).

This two day workshop is offered either privately or through partners who sponsor a public workshop. For additional information on the Leader's Workshop please contact us at info@poppendieck.com.

4. nóv

8.30 – 17.00

Product Owner Masterclass

Roman Pichler

Verð97.500 kr.

Roman Pichler

Product Owner Masterclass

Attend this masterclass and take your product owner practice to the next level, improve your ability to coach and mentor product owners, and to establish effective product ownership in the organisation. Learn how to apply the product owner role effectively, to tackle user experience (UX) aspects and move bogong user stories, to understand the pre-Scrum work, and to learn how establishing the product owner role can facilitate organisational changes.

5. nóv

8.30 – 18.00

Agile Ísland 2014

Verð37.500 kr.

6. nóv

8.30 – 17.00

Sketching Your Software Architecture

Simon Brown

Verð97.500 kr.

Simon Brown

Sketching Your Software Architecture

Agility is about moving fast and this requires good communication. A consistent, shared vision is essential in order for teams to push in the same direction, but it's surprising that many teams struggle to effectively communicate the architecture of the software they are building. As an industry we do have the Unified Modeling Language (UML), yet many people favour informal "boxes and lines" sketches instead. The problem is that such diagrams rarely make any sense, usually need a narrative to accompany them and ultimately slow the team down. Although we can argue whether UML offers an effective way to communicate software architecture, that's often irrelevant because many teams have already thrown out UML or simply don't know it. Abandoning UML is one thing but, in the race for agility, many software development teams have lost the ability to communicate visually too.

This hands-on workshop is aimed at those involved in the software development process and is about improving communication. In part 1, you'll see some typical diagrams and we'll use these as a basis for understanding why they often don't communicate software architecture in an effective way. We'll also identify some anti-patterns of such diagrams, which will help you avoid them in the future.

In part 2, you'll learn some lightweight techniques for communicating the static structure of a software system based upon a small number of simple sketches. We'll be focussing on "boxes and lines" sketches although the same principles are applicable to UML.

 

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